Mobile adverts embedded in premium content are more visible and easier to recall

kargo

Adverts which are embedded in premium content such as news or entertainment features are more effective than ads placed alongside social media or search feeds, because they are more visible on screen and can be recalled more easily.

These findings are the latest from the Feed vs. Read study by mobile brand advertiser Kargo in collaboration with Nielsen.

As part of the study, 100 participants were selected to engage with adverts on their mobile devices in premium content, social and search environments. Eye tracking technology was used to measure how long respondents viewed the ads on-screen to measure consumer attention to ads and whether ads were fully visible and could be remembered.

When it comes to visibility, editorial environments offer much better results with 96% of ads visible, compared to 79% in social feeds. Indeed, social media feeds tend to be more cluttered and heavy in images compared to editorial pages.

kargo

Interestingly, less than a third of ads on social feeds are actually visible for more than two seconds, compared to 82% of ads on editorial sites.

Screen shot 2017-03-03 at 7.32.19 AM

In addition, ads within editorial settings tend to be fully visible on screens for 44 seconds, compared to 6 seconds in search and just 3 seconds in social.

Recall is an important standard in judging the effectiveness of a brand advert. Kargo found that editorial content embedded ads were far more efficient and took a lot less time (1.6 seconds) to promote successful recall, compared to 2.8 seconds on search and a whopping 10.7 seconds in social.

Screen shot 2017-03-03 at 7.32.25 AM

Ed Romaine, CMO, Kargo, explains:

“This study validates what we’ve always believed at Kargo: that editorial is the best investment for mobile brand advertisers. By placing ads in the highest quality editorial environments through our alliance of premium publishers, our brand clients know their ads are being seen and absorbed by real people.”