Mobile video to account for half of all video plays by end of 2015, says Ooyala


Video metrics firm Ooyala recently released its Q2 Global Video Indexwhich finds that mobile video plays reached 44% during the second quarter of 2015, up 74% the year over and a staggering 844% since Q2 2012. The company expects smartphones to account for half of all video plays on mobile devices by the end of this year. Evidently, marketers are also shifting focus to match the rise in consumer viewing habits.

Mobile video’s dramatic rise



In addition, the firm found that consumer prefer to view longer videos on larger screens such as tablets (57%), TVs (53%) or desktops (40%). Only 33% of videos longer than 10 minutes are being viewed on phones. Shorter content scored more views on smartphones (67%). Recent trends towards larger smartphone screens will likely have an effect on numbers in the future as more consumers turn to their smartphones to view video.

Tablets are the preferred viewing devices for longer videos



The report further highlights the rise of programmatic trading with broadcasters and publishers having increased their eCPMs by over 25% during Q2 2015. Collective programmatic ad revenue rose 119%.

Meanwhile, ad completion rates rose only slightly compared to Q1 with tablets scoring the highest completion rates of 92% for broadcasters (89% in Q1) and 77% for publishers (up 10% from Q1).

Ad completion rates rose only slightly during the second quarter



Jim O’Neill, Principal Analyst, Ooyala, concludes:

jim oneill ooyala

“It’s all about mobile. From the array of devices on which we watch TV to the way the industry has begun to treat ad inventories, all signs point to mobile as the key to a bigger, better TV business. This quarter’s growth of broadband subscribers and the corresponding loss of pay-TV subscribers, paired with the increase of digital ad spend by brands and agencies is the evidence that business models, budgets and strategies from broadcasters to advertisers are changing dramatically to align with viewer behaviour.”